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Village Workshop: Nightmare on Name Street

October 23, 2014
October 23, 2014 2:00 PM
END TIME:
3:30 pm
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How to make your company supremely valuable (and saleable) with a powerful brand strategy.


Early stage companies (and well established ones) often overlook the importance of creating corporate value through a coherent brand strategy. Often they focus on brand and technology and will get to “brand” later. A brand strategy is not just picking a trademark and registering it. It involves following the Three Key Rules of Branding, which will be explained and demonstrated by example. This is presentation is in “edutainment” format, and has been shown around the world to over 5,000 CEOs and is typically the highest rated presentation of the conference in which it is appears. You are sure to enjoy it.

Takeaways:


  1. How to build an “UBER” brand strategy which makes your company valuable and very saleable.
  2. Learn how to not violate Three Rules of Branding.
  3. Learn how to generate your own brand names.
  4. Understanding “strategic positioning” and how to create yours.


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nightmare



About the Speaker: Michael Lasky, Altera Law Group
Warning: the speaker is an IP attorney, but unlike one you have ever met. We promise you will be entertained (and educated). This program has been shown around the world and it is always a rave. Lawyers are generally focused on law. Marketers are focused on marketing, but in branding, the two are totally intertwined and who is watching the store? Michael Lasky fills that gap. He is a patent and trademark attorney at two law firms: Altera Law Group (Atlanta) and SLW law (large national IP firm). He is an expert in brand strategy and the integration of marketing principles and legal boundaries. He will help you create a strategy which a) works and b) its legal! If want to see some videos from Michael in advance of this program, to go:
- How Amazon almost lost their brand
- If you own you domain, do you own your trademark?
- What is Fair Use?